top of page
thumbnail  55443_edited.png

INDIGENOUS LEARNING

Indigenous learning is a unique approach to education that emphasizes the importance of learning how to learn, developing intuitive understanding, and respecting time-tested traditions of learning. Indigenous learning is rooted in the idea that knowledge is situated in relationship to a location, experience, and group of people.

Here are some key principles of Indigenous learning.

The Right Education

thumbnail  55443_edited.png
HCU lOGO.png

INDIGENOUS LEARNING

 

Learning How to Learn

One of the most important elements of Indigenous teaching and learning revolves around "learning how to learn". Learning how to learn is a key element in every approach to education. Therefore, the cultivation of the human capacities listening, observing, experiencing with all one's senses, developing intuitive understanding, and respecting time-tested traditions of learning naturally formed the basis for skills used in every process of Indigenous learning and teaching.

Oral Traditions and Cultural Context:

Indigenous learning involves oral traditions such as listening, watching, and imitating, as well as high levels of cultural context. Learning in Indigenous communities is a process that involves all members in the community. The learning styles that children use in their Indigenous schooling are the same ones that occur in their community context. These Indigenous learning styles often include observation, imitation, use of narrative/storytelling, collaboration, and cooperation.

Relationality and Interconnection:

Indigenous learning emphasizes the concept of relationality, which is the idea that we are all related to each other, to the natural environment, and to the spiritual world, and these relationships bring about interdependencies. Curriculum developers can apply the concept of relationality by creating learning opportunities that emphasize learning in relationships with fellow students, teachers, families, members of

the community, and the local lands.

Sacred and Secular:

Indigenous ontologies and epistemologies are rooted in worldviews that are inclusive of both the sacred and the secular. In Indigenous ontologies, the world exists in one reality composed of an inseparable weave of secular and sacred dimensions. In Western educational approaches, there is often a separation between the secular and the sacred, which can lead to a lack of understanding of Indigenous knowledge systems.

Community-Based Learning and Service:

Indigenous learning often involves community-based learning and service. This means that learning is situated in relationship to a location, experience, and group of people. Indigenous learning communities can provide a supportive environment for students to learn and grow, and can help to foster a sense of belonging and connection to the community.

Oral Traditions and Storytelling:

Indigenous teaching methods often involve oral traditions, such as listening, watching, and imitating. The use of narrative or storytelling is a common method of teaching and learning in Indigenous communities. Stories are used to pass on cultural knowledge, history, and values from one generation to the next.


 

INDIGENOUS LEARNING

Place-Based Learning:

Place-based education promotes learning experiences that are rooted in the cultural, historical, environmental, economic, and literary contexts of students. It is critical to understand the ways that culture and place are intrinsic to the experiences of Indigenous students and other populations.

Collaborative Learning:

Collaboration and cooperation are key aspects of Indigenous learning styles. Learning in Indigenous communities is a process that involves all members of the community, fostering a sense of shared responsibility and mutual support.

Cultural Understanding:

Developing a cultural understanding is a crucial aspect of Indigenous teaching methods. This involves continuously learning about local Indigenous culture, history, and issues, and ensuring that teaching methods are culturally responsive and respectful of Indigenous worldviews.

Practical Needs and Survival Skills

Indigenous teaching methods often focus on the practical needs of the community, including learning how to survive in the natural environment. This can involve teaching skills related to hunting, fishing, gathering, agriculture, and other aspects of traditional Indigenous lifestyles

Promoting Indigenous Culture

Indigenous teaching methods often involve promoting Indigenous culture, including traditional ceremonies, languages, and cultural practices. This can involve incorporating these elements into the curriculum and

teaching methods.

 

In conclusion, Indigenous learning is a unique approach to education that emphasizes the importance of  learning how to learn, developing intuitive understanding, and respecting time-tested traditions of learning.

It is rooted in the idea that knowledge is situated in relationship to a location, experience, and group of people. Indigenous learning involves oral traditions, cultural context, relationality, and community-based learning and service. By incorporating these principles into education, we can create a more inclusive and holistic approach to learning that respects and honors Indigenous knowledge systems. Indigenous teaching methods are diverse and varied, reflecting the rich cultural traditions and knowledge systems of Indigenous communities worldwide.

 

KOHRAC LOGO CIRCLE.png
OFFICIAL SEAL OF THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION 2021 (2)_edited.png
Untitled  HHHH_edited.png
6664.png
bottom of page